Home Trends for 2017

As a new year rolls in, so do some new home trends. Here is a look at what you may expect to see at an open house near you in 2017.

It is easy being green. The Pantone 2017 Color of the Year, Greenery, has been called the world’s brightest neutral. This color represents rejuvenation according to Leatrice Eiseman, executive director of the Pantone Color Institute.

While on the topic of color, in 2017, navy is expected to be the new black. A sophisticated color, navy is making its way into homes in a big way to open up spaces, whereas black, which tends to minimize space, is scaling back.

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Say hello to faux. Experts predict that faux materials are going to be strong in 2017. The Wall Street Journal reported that even luxury homeowners were warming to faux materials such as faux marble and barn wood. Aside from being used as a reliable, budget-friendly alternative, additional faux materials like indoor foliage offer instant gratification with zero upkeep. Winter staging just got a lot easier!

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Fluttering design with butterflies. These fairytale-like creatures are not just for children’s rooms anymore. Butterflies, which symbolize optimism and grace, are showing up in large numbers on walls, pillows and home accents.
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Cork it. Cork is back with its multitude of purposes, natural qualities, sustainability and color tones.
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Other notable home trends to look for in 2017 include white kitchens with wood countertops, full kitchen walls of tile, modern-style bar stools, and fully decked-out laundry rooms with natural light and maximum space.

What home trends have you read about or noticed?

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Making It Rain – Utilize Rain Water All Year Long

Real Estate Trends

Water supply is an ongoing concern for many, especially those living in drought-stricken areas. This is one reason why the conversation about collecting and utilizing rainwater as a means for battling supply challenges is ongoing. Real estate agents can use this information to help their clients better understand this trend in real estate.  Why Homeowners Are Collecting Rainwater

By collecting rain and storing it in a barrel or tank, homeowners can create a supply of water to use that doesn’t increase water bills or overwork groundwater resources.

An additional benefit of rainwater collection is that rain doesn’t contain the minerals found in wells or the chlorine in municipal supplies. Rain collection is ideal for large water usages such as watering the lawn, washing the car, doing the laundry and showering/bathing. It is generally not used for drinking; however, it can be if properly filtered.

Understanding Rainwater Collection Systems

Collection systems range from a single rain barrel placed at the end of a gutter downspout to an elaborate system that can hold enough water to supply your entire home.

A house with a sloped roof, gutters and/or downspouts is perfect for rainwater collection intended for lawn irrigation or other nonpotable uses. All that is needed is a tank, a wire/mesh gutter screen to keep debris out, and a way to remove the water from the tank.

Your tank (or cistern) can be made from a range of materials including metal, wood, stone, cement or fiberglass. Garden and home supply stores offer rain collection systems complete with your barrel, leaf screens and spouts. The costs vary but expect to pay from $50 – $300 for a complete barrel system. Depending on how you plan to use it will determine the type, cost and complexity.

The easiest and most cost-effective way to remove water from your collection tank is by gravity. If you want a more elaborate use for your water, you’ll need a pump. Pumps provide about 8 gallons of water a minute up to 500 feet away.

Regulations

Homeowners should check with their homeowners association to ensure they comply with such rules as placement, color and aize of the rain barrel.

If using collected rainwater for the entire home, homeowners should check local codes and ordinances.

Concerns

It’s a good idea to use a roof washer to remove leaves, debris and droppings to create a clean line for the water entering the storage tank.

Mosquitoes are a natural concern for any collection of standing water, so be sure that your tank is screened and covered. If you live in areas that freeze, allow your barrel to only fill three fourths full to allow water expansion in freezing temperatures.

Aesthetics of rain barrels were once a concern, but not as much anymore. With the wide variety of collection tanks available, your cistern doesn’t have to be an eyesore. Many agree that the wooden tanks meant to resemble wine casks are actually quite charming. A carefully, yet strategically, placed tank can be hidden so as not to detract from your homes beautiful landscape.

DIY Natural Pesticide Sprays

Natural pesticides are safer for people, their homes, gardens, animals and the environment. Nowadays homeowners are more conscious about the chemicals they use in and around the home, including pesticides. Here are some helpful natural pesticide recipes you can share with your clients to help them keep their yards pest and chemical-free.

Thyme-Oil-Natural_DIY_Yard_Spray.pngWhen using natural DIY pesticdes, spray in the early morning or late evening to avoid burning plants. Also remember to keep pets away during application since certain ingredients such as essential oils and cayenne pepper can be harmful if ingested. Always use sparingly and only on infected areas. And if it recently rained or will rain soon, wait until the ground is dry before spraying to avoid runoff waste and dilution.

Ready to get started?

Four DIY Ideas For a Chemical-Free Yard

  1. Neem Oil
    The oil from the extremely bitter neem plant is a powerful, all-natural pesticide.

DIY neem oil spray:  Combine ½ an ounce of organic neem oil, ½ a teaspoon of mild organic liquid soap and 2 quarts of warm water. Stir slowly, pour in spray bottle and use immediately.

  1. Diatomaceous Earth    
    An all-natural powder solution for insects of all kinds including fleas.

An all-natural powder solution for insects of all kinds including fleas. Sprinkle diatomaceous earth on top of soil around plants and around the perimeter of the house. It can be used inside as well. Look for the food-grade version so it is safer to use around pets.

  1. Himalayan Salt Spray 
    Effective for treating plants infested with spider mites. Spray where needed.

DIY salt spray: Combine 2 tablespoons with 1 gallon of warm water. Spray on infected plants.

  1. Citrus Oil + Cayenne Pepper   
    Works well on ants. Spray populated areas accordingly.

DYI spray: Combine 10 drops of citrus oil for every teaspoon of cayenne pepper and 1 cup of warm water. Shake well and spray areas populated by ants.